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#TechNews: #Gmail will soon block #JavaScript file attachments to reduce malicious attacks! #Business #Technology #Innovations #JS #TechnologyHouse #GoogleNews #DigitalAgency #TechnologyConsultancy

#TechNews: #Gmail will soon block #JavaScript file attachments to reduce malicious attacks! #Business #Technology #Innovations #JS #TechnologyHouse #GoogleNews #DigitalAgency #TechnologyConsultancy

#TechNews: #Gmail will soon block #JavaScript file attachments to reduce malicious attacks! #Business #Technology #Innovations #JS #TechnologyHouse #GoogleNews #DigitalAgency #TechnologyConsultancy

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The fully operational #Apple 1 Computer has sold at auction in Germany for a record $671,400, breaking the previous mark of $640,000 set last November at the same auction house. #Business #Technology #Innovation

The fully operational #Apple 1 Computer has sold at auction in Germany for a record $671,400, breaking the previous mark of $640,000 set last November at the same auction house. #Business #Technology #Innovation

The fully operational #Apple 1 Computer has sold at auction in Germany for a record $671,400, breaking the previous mark of $640,000 set last November at the same auction house. #Business #Technology #Innovation

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... New Downdraft Tower Could Revolutionize Wind Power ... A revolutionary new clean energy technology is getting set to change the way we think about wind power. The Solar Wind Downdraft Tower, created by Maryland-based Solar Wind Energy Inc. turns the traditional wind turbine design on its head by putting turbines at the base of a tubular tower that generates its own wind throughout the year. How does it work? Read on. A tower at the center of the system creates a downdraft by using a series of pumps to carry water to the top of the 2,250-foot structure. Once the water has reached the top, it’s distributed as a fine mist across the opening, according to Gizmag. The mist evaporates and is absorbed by hot, dry air – which makes the air cooler, denser and heavier than the warmer air outside the tower. The cooled air then falls through the hollow tower at speeds up to 50 mph (80 km/h) and is directed through tunnels where it turns turbines housed inside them. One downside to the system is that it requires a lot of water to operate, but it does capture and recirculate excess water from the generation process.

... New Downdraft Tower Could Revolutionize Wind Power ... A revolutionary new clean energy technology is getting set to change the way we think about wind power. The Solar Wind Downdraft Tower, created by Maryland-based Solar Wind Energy Inc. turns the traditional wind turbine design on its head by putting turbines at the base of a tubular tower that generates its own wind throughout the year. How does it work? Read on. A tower at the center of the system creates a downdraft by using a series of pumps to carry water to the top of the 2,250-foot structure. Once the water has reached the top, it’s distributed as a fine mist across the opening, according to Gizmag. The mist evaporates and is absorbed by hot, dry air – which makes the air cooler, denser and heavier than the warmer air outside the tower. The cooled air then falls through the hollow tower at speeds up to 50 mph (80 km/h) and is directed through tunnels where it turns turbines housed inside them. One downside to the system is that it requires a lot of water to operate, but it does capture and recirculate excess water from the generation process.

... New Downdraft Tower Could Revolutionize Wind Power ... A revolutionary new clean energy technology is getting set to change the way we think about wind power. The Solar Wind Downdraft Tower, created by Maryland-based Solar Wind Energy Inc. turns the traditional wind turbine design on its head by putting turbines at the base of a tubular tower that generates its own wind throughout the year. How does it work? Read on. A tower at the center of the system creates a downdraft by using a series of pumps to carry water to the top of the 2,250-foot structure. Once the water has reached the top, it’s distributed as a fine mist across the opening, according to Gizmag. The mist evaporates and is absorbed by hot, dry air – which makes the air cooler, denser and heavier than the warmer air outside the tower. The cooled air then falls through the hollow tower at speeds up to 50 mph (80 km/h) and is directed through tunnels where it turns turbines housed inside them. One downside to the system is that it requires a lot of water to operate, but it does capture and recirculate excess water from the generation process.

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#Didyouknow - Cloud services can offer benefits over the traditional approach of providing infrastructure and running software in-house. You should always balance this with the challenges of using cloud services, to decide whether cloud or in-house offers the best solution for you.

#Didyouknow - Cloud services can offer benefits over the traditional approach of providing infrastructure and running software in-house. You should always balance this with the challenges of using cloud services, to decide whether cloud or in-house offers the best solution for you.

#Didyouknow - Cloud services can offer benefits over the traditional approach of providing infrastructure and running software in-house. You should always balance this with the challenges of using cloud services, to decide whether cloud or in-house offers the best solution for you.

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... Self-Healing Concrete With Micro-Capsules and Bacteria ... Sooner or later, even the best sidewalk in the country will develop a crack or two. When this happens, workers are deployed to either fill in the damage or lay down completely new swaths of concrete. Over 7 per cent of the world’s CO2 emissions come from cement production, so any means of prolonging the material’s life would help to reduce greenhouse gasses. Researchers at Cardiff University, the University of Cambridge, and the University of Bath are taking part in a £3m project to create self-healing concrete. The material would be able to mend itself with the help of bacteria contained within microcapsules that would germinate and produce limestone when water enters a fissure. Read more: http://inhabitat.com/scientists-developing-self-healing-concrete-with-micro-capsules-and-bacteria/

... Self-Healing Concrete With Micro-Capsules and Bacteria ... Sooner or later, even the best sidewalk in the country will develop a crack or two. When this happens, workers are deployed to either fill in the damage or lay down completely new swaths of concrete. Over 7 per cent of the world’s CO2 emissions come from cement production, so any means of prolonging the material’s life would help to reduce greenhouse gasses. Researchers at Cardiff University, the University of Cambridge, and the University of Bath are taking part in a £3m project to create self-healing concrete. The material would be able to mend itself with the help of bacteria contained within microcapsules that would germinate and produce limestone when water enters a fissure. Read more: http://inhabitat.com/scientists-developing-self-healing-concrete-with-micro-capsules-and-bacteria/

... Self-Healing Concrete With Micro-Capsules and Bacteria ... Sooner or later, even the best sidewalk in the country will develop a crack or two. When this happens, workers are deployed to either fill in the damage or lay down completely new swaths of concrete. Over 7 per cent of the world’s CO2 emissions come from cement production, so any means of prolonging the material’s life would help to reduce greenhouse gasses. Researchers at Cardiff University, the University of Cambridge, and the University of Bath are taking part in a £3m project to create self-healing concrete. The material would be able to mend itself with the help of bacteria contained within microcapsules that would germinate and produce limestone when water enters a fissure. Read more: http://inhabitat.com/scientists-developing-self-healing-concrete-with-micro-capsules-and-bacteria/

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... Google’s Plan to Take Android Everywhere ... Google wants to connect all your devices to the Android ecosystem and then expose their functionality to app developers. Apps to control your light, wash your dishes and even grow your vegetables in your in-house garden are just part of a bigger plan of real-world domination.

... Google’s Plan to Take Android Everywhere ... Google wants to connect all your devices to the Android ecosystem and then expose their functionality to app developers. Apps to control your light, wash your dishes and even grow your vegetables in your in-house garden are just part of a bigger plan of real-world domination.

... Google’s Plan to Take Android Everywhere ... Google wants to connect all your devices to the Android ecosystem and then expose their functionality to app developers. Apps to control your light, wash your dishes and even grow your vegetables in your in-house garden are just part of a bigger plan of real-world domination.

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The race to build the first 3D-printed house has begun. Teams of architects are competing to produce the first habitable printed structure, using technology that could transform the way buildings are made. Though they all have the same objective, the teams are investigating very different materials and fabrication methods.

The race to build the first 3D-printed house has begun. Teams of architects are competing to produce the first habitable printed structure, using technology that could transform the way buildings are made. Though they all have the same objective, the teams are investigating very different materials and fabrication methods.

The race to build the first 3D-printed house has begun. Teams of architects are competing to produce the first habitable printed structure, using technology that could transform the way buildings are made. Though they all have the same objective, the teams are investigating very different materials and fabrication methods.

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Cacoon hanging treehouse for all Treehouses are one of those childhood obsessions that never lose their appeal for many people, even after making their way into adulthood. Unfortunately, society frowns upon grown-ups messing around in treehouses, but Cacoon could possibly make the form factor acceptable for everyone, regardless of their age or level of maturity.

Cacoon hanging treehouse for all Treehouses are one of those childhood obsessions that never lose their appeal for many people, even after making their way into adulthood. Unfortunately, society frowns upon grown-ups messing around in treehouses, but Cacoon could possibly make the form factor acceptable for everyone, regardless of their age or level of maturity.

Cacoon hanging treehouse for all Treehouses are one of those childhood obsessions that never lose their appeal for many people, even after making their way into adulthood. Unfortunately, society frowns upon grown-ups messing around in treehouses, but Cacoon could possibly make the form factor acceptable for everyone, regardless of their age or level of maturity.

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2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

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Motorola Unveils S11-Flex HD Customizable Headphones - Motorola has unveiled a new set of wireless headphones called the S11-Flex HD. The new headphones promise a custom and very comfortable fit while delivering high-quality audio. The headphones have a flexible outer band and an adjustable inner band along with telescoping and rotating earpieces. These features enable lots of customization for the ideal fit. The headphones are also sealed against moisture to keep sweat out of sensitive electronics. The headphones have the wireless range of up to 150 feet from your smart phone music player. That means you can leave your smartphones in the house in some instances and listen outside. Motorola says that charging the headphones for 15 minutes allows you to listen for up to three hours. The headphones also have dedicated music and volume controls.

Motorola Unveils S11-Flex HD Customizable Headphones - Motorola has unveiled a new set of wireless headphones called the S11-Flex HD. The new headphones promise a custom and very comfortable fit while delivering high-quality audio. The headphones have a flexible outer band and an adjustable inner band along with telescoping and rotating earpieces. These features enable lots of customization for the ideal fit. The headphones are also sealed against moisture to keep sweat out of sensitive electronics. The headphones have the wireless range of up to 150 feet from your smart phone music player. That means you can leave your smartphones in the house in some instances and listen outside. Motorola says that charging the headphones for 15 minutes allows you to listen for up to three hours. The headphones also have dedicated music and volume controls.

Motorola Unveils S11-Flex HD Customizable Headphones - Motorola has unveiled a new set of wireless headphones called the S11-Flex HD. The new headphones promise a custom and very comfortable fit while delivering high-quality audio. The headphones have a flexible outer band and an adjustable inner band along with telescoping and rotating earpieces. These features enable lots of customization for the ideal fit. The headphones are also sealed against moisture to keep sweat out of sensitive electronics. The headphones have the wireless range of up to 150 feet from your smart phone music player. That means you can leave your smartphones in the house in some instances and listen outside. Motorola says that charging the headphones for 15 minutes allows you to listen for up to three hours. The headphones also have dedicated music and volume controls.

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:: Olympus MEG4.0 Eyewear Unveiled :: The Olympus MEG4.0 has been designed to connect to our devices via Bluetooth and is equipped with Olympus’s in-house “proprietary optical technology”. The MEG4.0 is equipped with a QVGA 320 x 240 display and is able to provide a users with eight hours of use on a single charge. Using a features called “intermittent display” mode which switch on the device every three minutes for 15 seconds.

:: Olympus MEG4.0 Eyewear Unveiled :: The Olympus MEG4.0 has been designed to connect to our devices via Bluetooth and is equipped with Olympus’s in-house “proprietary optical technology”. The MEG4.0 is equipped with a QVGA 320 x 240 display and is able to provide a users with eight hours of use on a single charge. Using a features called “intermittent display” mode which switch on the device every three minutes for 15 seconds.

:: Olympus MEG4.0 Eyewear Unveiled :: The Olympus MEG4.0 has been designed to connect to our devices via Bluetooth and is equipped with Olympus’s in-house “proprietary optical technology”. The MEG4.0 is equipped with a QVGA 320 x 240 display and is able to provide a users with eight hours of use on a single charge. Using a features called “intermittent display” mode which switch on the device every three minutes for 15 seconds.

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:: Sony flashes new high-definition wearable video camera :: a high-definition wearable video camera that is tiny and lightweight. Sony said that it will house Sony’s trademark SteadyShot image stabilization technology. In case you did not know, SteadyShot uses motion sensors to ensure that images will remain motionless as much as possible. Sony’s new “action camera” will also sport an Exmor R CMOS image sensor and an ultra-wide angle Carl Zeiss Tessar lens.

:: Sony flashes new high-definition wearable video camera :: a high-definition wearable video camera that is tiny and lightweight. Sony said that it will house Sony’s trademark SteadyShot image stabilization technology. In case you did not know, SteadyShot uses motion sensors to ensure that images will remain motionless as much as possible. Sony’s new “action camera” will also sport an Exmor R CMOS image sensor and an ultra-wide angle Carl Zeiss Tessar lens.

:: Sony flashes new high-definition wearable video camera :: a high-definition wearable video camera that is tiny and lightweight. Sony said that it will house Sony’s trademark SteadyShot image stabilization technology. In case you did not know, SteadyShot uses motion sensors to ensure that images will remain motionless as much as possible. Sony’s new “action camera” will also sport an Exmor R CMOS image sensor and an ultra-wide angle Carl Zeiss Tessar lens.

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